Kelly Bronson contributes to Council of Canadian Academies’ report on the existing and emerging risks to plant health in Canada

Posted on Thursday, January 27, 2022

The Center for Law, Technology and Society is delighted to announce that CLTS Faculty member Dr. Kelly Bronson has contributed to Cultivating Diversity, a report released by the Council of Canadian Academies to examine the existing and emerging risks to plant health in Canada and to offer insights into promising practices that may help to mitigate them.

The Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) assembled an expert panel, including Dr. Kelly Bronson, to examine the existing and emerging risks to plant health in Canada and to offer insights into promising practices that may help to mitigate them. 

Climate change has exacerbated existing risks, such as extreme weather events, disease, and predators, while the increasing global movement of people and goods, and evolutionary processes add to the threat, demanding a change in Canada’s approach to protecting plant health. 

According to the Expert Panel, connecting the research and work of academics, governments, Indigenous Peoples, NGOs, farmers, foresters, citizen scientists, and others can help mitigate and manage emerging risks. 

Protecting plant health is complicated by the interconnectedness of risks and a diversity of perspectives. Cultivating Diversity explores key areas of risks as well as strategies to reduce vulnerability and increase resilience. The report details how an inclusive, connected, and responsive plant health system is key to addressing plant health risks in Canada. 

 

Read the report

The report is also available in French

 

Dr. Kelly Bronson is the Canada Research Chair in Science and Society at the University of Ottawa. She is a social scientist studying science-society tensions that erupt around controversial technologies (GMOs, fracking, big data & AI) and their governance. Her research aims to bring community values into conversation with technical knowledge in the production of evidence-based decision-making.  

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