CLTS students receive grants from the University of Ottawa’s Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program for 2018

Posted on Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Six students working with Faculty members of the Centre for Law, Technology and Society are among the grant recipients from the University of Ottawa’s Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program for 2018: Pier-Luc Bisaillon Landry, Uttra Gautam, Sean Grassie, Alyssa Hall, Tara Hrisov and Véronique Newman.

The program provides undergraduate students with unique and exciting opportunities to explore cutting-edge research at the University of Ottawa while they define their professional goals.

 

Pier-Luc Bisaillon Landry received a grant to study national security law and acts of whistleblowing  under the supervision of Dr. Florian Martin-Bariteau. Following various scandals of mass surveillance and disclosure of military secrets that have recently made headlines, the project will shed light on the legal national security framework applicable to the disclosure of national secrets in Canada. What is the protection regime for such secrets? What risks do whistleblowers face? This research builds on questions explored in the US Snowden and Manning cases and aims to further them in the Canadian context.

Pier-Luc is a second year LL.L. candidate. He is currently a research assistant for Professor Martin-Bariteau. Before that, he completed a B.Sc in psychology at UQAM in 2010 and worked as a social worker for the Centre de jeunesse de Montréal.

 

Uttra Gautam received a grant to study how investment protection rules differ depending on whether they are contained in trade or investment agreements under the supervision of Dr. Wolfgang Alschner. This project will assess whether investment rules differ depending on whether they are found in a trade or in a self-standing investment agreement, approaching the question from a legal data science angle.

Uttra is a second year JD candidate at the University of Ottawa. She was a 2017 Technoship student at CIPPIC, sat on the board of directors at the Ontario Public Interest Research Group and interned at the Ontario Court of Justice. She has worked at two entrepreneurship incubators, assisting over 50 startups with their launch and managed an advisory team of 12 Rotman School of Management MBA students. Prior to attending law school, she obtained a Bachelors of Science from the University of Toronto.

 

Sean Grassie received a grant to work on an online tool empowering Canadian wireless consumers to be better self-helpers under the supervision of Professor Marina Pavlović. The project focuses on consumer rights in the digital economy and aims to design an evaluation framework to assess the effectiveness of an online tool for empowering wireless consumers about their rights and problem solving pathways.

Sean is a third year student in the joint JD/MA program at the University of Ottawa's Faculty of Law and Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (Carleton University). He is currently a Research Assistant with Professors Cavanagh and Pavlovic, and was a 2016 Technoship student as well as a 2016 CIPPIC Summer intern. Sean has Honours Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Communications from Carleton University.

 

Alyssa Hall received a grant to work on the classification and regulation of virtual currencies in Canada under the supervision of professor Florian Martin-Bariteau. Virtual currencies combine properties of currencies, commodities, and payments systems, and their classification as one or the other will often have implications for their legal and regulatory treatment—in particular, in determining which national agencies should regulate them.

Alyssa is a second year student in the University of Ottawa's English Common Law Program. She is currently working as a research assistant with Dr. Martin-Bariteau on blockchain and cryptocurrencies, and was 2017 Technoship student. Prior to attending law school, Alyssa graduated in 2016 with a HBA from Ivey Business School at Western University. During the past summer, Alyssa also worked as a legal intern for a Member of the Parliament and as an economic public policy analyst.

 

Tara Hristov received a grant to assess regulatory requirements for plain language in wireless service contracts under the supervision of Marina Pavlović. This project will focus on consumer rights in the digital economy and aims to design an evaluation framework to assess the plain language requirements of consumer contracts, in particular, related to the Wireless Code.

Tara is a first year JD candidate at the University of Ottawa, where she also earned her Bachelor of Social Sciences--Joint Honours in Political Science and Communication. She has previously worked as a teaching and research assistant in the uOttawa Department of Communication and as an analyst at the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and Global Affairs Canada.

 

Véronique Newman received a grant to research the current protection offered to journalistic sources in Canada under the supervision of Dr. Florian Martin-Bariteau. Following the various scandals that made headlines in 2016-2017, the work will aim to provide a real account of the legislative framework applicable to the protection of journalistic sources in Canada. Who is protected? Under what conditions and to what extent?

Véronique is a second year student in the Programme de droit canadien. She is currently working as a research assistant with Dr. Martin-Bariteau on secrets and whistleblowers, and was 2017 Technoship student. She previously studied political science and anthropology at McGill University and is currently the Pro Bono Students Canada - Civil law section coordinator.

 

Congratulations to our students!

 

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